Quillus q.

nihilnovisubsole:

scary russian big sister

buddhabrot:


Laurel Leaf Tiara belonging to Queen Sophia of Greece

still one of my fav finds on the internet 

buddhabrot:

Laurel Leaf Tiara belonging to Queen Sophia of Greece

still one of my fav finds on the internet 

reptangle:

Raven by Reptangle Raven study , done with a brush and black ink. I used a stuffed raven as a model, loaned from the LA museum of Natural History.

reptangle:

Raven by Reptangle
Raven study , done with a brush and black ink. I used a stuffed raven as a model, loaned from the LA museum of Natural History.

b-l-a-c-k-o-r-c-h-i-d:

Martin Wittfooth's Tooth and Claw

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Born in 1981 in Toronto and spending most of his childhood in Finland, Martin Wittfooth is a New York City-based artist with an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. His luminous yet foreboding oil paintings portray scenes of nature fighting against the destructive hand of man, whether it’s the toxic industries he’s created or the evolutionary havoc he is wreaking on the animal kingdom. Humanity’s footprint is forever etched into the landscapes of the earth, and through a powerful visual narrative Wittfooth explores its lasting effects through representations of animals interacting with man’s industrial and societal creations, a sort of cautionary tale of what’s potentially to come.

stonelions:

give yourself over to the wolf. let it eat the parts of you that are sick, that are damaged beyond salvage. let the wolf in and let it clean house, and let it leave again. the wolf knows which parts must be swallowed. you do not need what it takes, and where it bites you the wounds will heal. let the wolf in and let it eat you, and let it leave again.  

stonelions:

give yourself over to the wolf. let it eat the parts of you that are sick, that are damaged beyond salvage. let the wolf in and let it clean house, and let it leave again. the wolf knows which parts must be swallowed. you do not need what it takes, and where it bites you the wounds will heal. let the wolf in and let it eat you, and let it leave again.  

fairy-wren:

Greater Yellownape (Picus flavinucha) by gary1844 on Flickr.

gatsbygal:

i was looking up historically accurate clothing as a bit of art inspiration and found the online museum of saudi arabian costume

there’s a bunch more gems just like these and they’re all so beautiful and unique.  there’s also great information about the clothing, too, such as how they were made, who wore them, what fabrics were used, what the different parts of the costumes were called, etc.  just a really fun and informative site and i thought i would share my find.

spinning-the-classics:

vosnianprincess:

characterdesigninspiration:

[x]

*sobs* I just wanna have nice things…

Yooooo~

c0ssette:

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema,The Roses of Heliogabalus (1888) details.

monobeartheater:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

chaoticbanter:

beharkei:

Mermaid by Sergey Kolesov

Ok, that’s fucking terrifying and cool.

woah I love this interpretation of mermaids. not human sized, but the size of like a blue whale


TITANS IN THE WATER

monobeartheater:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

chaoticbanter:

beharkei:

Mermaid by Sergey Kolesov

Ok, that’s fucking terrifying and cool.

woah I love this interpretation of mermaids. not human sized, but the size of like a blue whale

TITANS IN THE WATER

ex0skeletal:

(via The Laughing Emperor (destroyed) by PilcrowDesigns on deviantART)
madnessbeckons:

Servant

madnessbeckons:

Servant

free-parking:

Xu BingTian Shu (Book from the Sky), 1987-1991

Tian Shu is comprised of a display of books spread in a large rectangle across the ground, above which voluptuous scrolls unroll in long, pregnant arcs. The books—four hundred of them—are handmade with reverential adherence to the standards of traditional Ming dynasty fonts, bookbinding, typesetting and stringing techniques. 

To make them, Xu painstakingly carved Chinese characters into square woodblocks, in just the way his ancient printing predecessors would have done, had them typeset and printed, and the printed pages mounted and bound into books and scrolls.

Yet, there’s the astonishing, Borgesian catch: out of the three or four thousand Chinese characters used in these volumes and scrolls, not a single one of them is a real Chinese characterThey are made up of recognizable radicals and typical atomic components of Chinese characters, but Xu laboured to ensure that while they all retain the unmistakable look of Chinese script, they are all, so to speak, nonsense. They do not exist in any dictionary, and do not mean anything. Chinese speakers and non-Chinese speakers alike approach the books with the same sense of wonder at their beauty, and the same sense of incomprehension at their content. It’s a piece of art whose meaning is to be found in its meaninglessness. (via)